Christianity

Shane has some good points

I’m (still) making, or wading, my way through Shane Claiborne’s The Irresistible Revolution: Living as an Ordinary Radical, and it’s very paradigm challenging, even when you read it over many months. Searching for one of the resources he mentions in the book, I came across this interview: Shane Claiborne – Fundamentalism http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSlLGq7LbWw I think he makes some rather pertinent pounts, no?

Two Historical Myths – Two Historical Revisions: Part 2

The second installment of this article on historical myths that I posted yesterday. Interesting reading – love reading about the compatability of science and Christianity!

Bible on Tap

498px-Christopher_Columbus Andrew Dickson (1832-1918) is responsible for one of the most influential books every written on “the conflict between science and theology”. His summary that has been copied in almost all common textbooks is as follows;

“The warfare of Columbus [with religion] the world knows well: how the Bishop of Ceuta worsted him in Portugal; how sundry wise men of Spain confronted him with the usual quotation from Psalms, from St. Paul, and from St. Augustine; how, even after he was triumphant, and after his voyage had greatly strengthened the theory of the earth’s sphericity… the church by its highest authority solemnly stumbled and persisted in going astray… the theological barriers to this geographical truth yielded but slowly.”

I remember hearing this from a young age. Even as most of my curriculum was christian because of my home schooling. The problem is that most accounts such as these are almost completely…

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Two Historical Myths – Two Historical Revisions: Part 1

I enjoyed reading this. It’s good to see one of the more interesting eras of European history starting to escape its “Dark” and wasted reputation. Also good to see thoughtful Christian historical scholarship 🙂

I also found this other article, also from Bible on Tap very worth the read: The Myth of the “Dark Ages” – Discovering Christian Heritage

Bible on Tap

Myth Number OneImage

For centuries it has been commonly held that after the fall of Rome came the “Dark Ages” -many centuries of ignorance and superstition imposed across Europe by Christianity.

“a dark, dismal patch, a sort of dull and dirty chunk of some ten centuries, wedged between the shinning days of the golden Greeks… and the brilliant galaxy of light given out jointly by those twin luminaries, the Renaissance and the Reformation.”-Anne Fremantle

Also Voltaire (1694-1778) described the long era as when “barbarism, superstition, and ignorance covered the face of the world”. These same sentiments were carried on by Edward Gibbon, and Rousseau. Likewise popular historian Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) agreed that “it is not inappropriate to call these centuries dark, especially if they are set against what came before and what came after.”

The term Renaissance and Enlightenment often appear simultaneously, at times along with the word…

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Evidence We Want and Evidence We Should Expect: A Look at Paul’s Letters

Interesting discussion of Paul’s letters and his authorship as evidence of Jesus.

THINKAPOLOGETICS.COM

Given that historians look to those who are contemporaries of the events, Paul is an important resource for what historians can know about Jesus of Nazareth. Furthermore, the earliest documents we have for the life of Jesus are Paul’s letters. Paul was a very competent rabbi who was trained at the rabbinic academy called the House of Hillel by ‘Gamaliel,’ a key rabbinic leader and member of the Sanhedrin.  Both Christian and non-Christian scholars have come to have great respect Paul. Allow me to mention a few comments here:

“Without knowing about first century Judaism, modern readers—even those committed to faith by reading him—are bound to misconstrue Paul’s writing…Paul is a trained Pharisee who became the apostle to the Gentiles.” –Alan Segal, Paul the Convert: The Apostolate and Apostasy of Saul the Pharisee (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1990), xi-xii

 

“Paul has left us an extremely precious document for…

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